Quince Paste – Birsalmasajt

by Molnár-Papp Orsolya Anna

Quince Paste or quince cheese is a firm, sliceable preservative made out of the golden apple. This amber – ruby-colored delicacy is also one of the oldest sweet treats in Hungary. It’s aromatic, chewy and you won’t stop after just one bite.

Quince Paste - Anna Can Do It!
© Anna Can Do It!

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Last year I finally decided to give homemade quince paste a try. It was a huge success and let me tell you, it was gone before I could blink. So this year I got my hands on a lot more quince.

It takes time to make, I won’t lie, but let me assure you it’ll worth every minute!

Quince Paste - Anna Can Do It!
© Anna Can Do It!

Add these to spice up your Quince Paste, find your favorite combination!

Variations:

  • Cinnamon
  • Star anise
  • Cardamom
  • Nutmeg
  • Chili
  • Orange peel
  • Ginger
  • Walnut
  • Almond
  • Hazelnut
  • Pumpkin seed
  • Poppyseed

Quince paste is so versatile! It’s delicious:

  • on its own,
  • with a slice of cheese,
  • dipped in chocolate,
  • rolled in sugar,
  • baked in a cake, a pastry,
  • on toast,
  • on a cracker,
  • wrapped in ham etc.

Quince Paste

Quince Paste

Quince Paste or quince cheese is a firm, sliceable preservative made out of the golden apple. This amber – ruby-colored delicacy is also one of the oldest sweet treats in Hungary. It's aromatic, chewy and you won't stop after just one bite.
Course Dessert
Cuisine Hungarian
Keyword Dessert, Quince, Quince Past, Quince Paste
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Resting time to dry 14 days
Servings 1 pan
Author Molnár-Papp Orsolya Anna

Equipment

  • Food Mill

Ingredients

  • 4.4 lbs Quince
  • 6 cups Sugar
  • 1 Lemon
  • Water

Instructions

  • Wash the fluffs off of the quinces. It's easier if you use a clean sponge.
  • Carefully with a sharp knife, dice the quinces. You don't need to peel them or cut out the cores, it contains more pectin, which will act as a gelling agent.
  • Add the diced quinces to a large pot and pour just enough water to cover them.
  • Cook them until the pieces are soft.
  • Strain them.
  • Blend them with a hand blender.
  • Press the fruit pulp through the food mill. Be very careful, because it's gonna be hot!
  • Add the sugar to the strained quince paste, mix it well.
  • Add the lemon juice to the mixture.
  • Put it back on the stove and cook it on low heat for 1.5-2 hours. Stir it frequently.
  • Be careful as the paste starts to thicken it tends to bubble which can burn you, but at this stage, the paste burns easier too, so stir it frequently!
  • When you can see the bottom of the pot while stirring, you can carefully pour the paste to a larger non-stick baking pan.
  • Leave the paste in the pan for 1-2 days, then turn it out onto a large piece of baking paper. To avoid getting any dust or any other thing on your paste, you can add a piece of baking paper on the top too. Let it dry, turn it every other day. It depends on your taste (or patience) when you decide it's ready. Personally I prefer it on the drier side, so I left mine for 2-3 weeks.

Food Mill on Amazon:


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Quince Paste - Anna Can Do It!
© Anna Can Do It!

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Also, check these recipes out!

  1. Galuska – Hungarian Dumplings
  2. Cranberry Pumpkin Seed Muffins
  3. Pumpkin Parfait With Sesame Praline
  4. Strawberry Blueberry Cupcake
  5. Homemade Eclairs with Blackberry and Vanilla Filling
  6. Hungarian Fried Dough – Lángos
  7. Hungarian Cottage Cheese Noodles
  8. Perfect Oven Fried Chicken

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